# Friday, 25 February 2011
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CLR Type Names

Type names look like a simple concept. Every type has a unique name within the assembly that defines it.

It turns out that there is a slight complication. Even though the CLI specification and the reflection API suggest that a type name is simply a string, in reality it is a pair of strings: { namespace, name }

Here's some code that uses IKVM.Reflection to generate an interesting assembly:

using IKVM.Reflection;
using IKVM.Reflection.Emit;

class Program {
  static void Main() {
    var universe = new Universe();
    var ab = universe.DefineDynamicAssembly(new AssemblyName("Test"), AssemblyBuilderAccess.Save);
    var modb = ab.DefineDynamicModule("Test", "Test.dll");
    modb.__DefineType("A.B", "C").CreateType();
    modb.__DefineType("A", "B.C").CreateType();
    ab.Save("Test.dll");
  }
}

This creates a valid (and verifiable) assembly containing two different types, both named A.B.C.

If you disassemble this assembly with ildasm and the resulting IL is reassembled with ilasm you won't end up with the same assembly. I don't know if there are any obfuscators that use this trick, but maybe they should.

Reflection APIs assume that the last dot in the type name separates the namespace from the name, so doing Type.GetType("A.B.C") will return the first type {"A.B", "C"}. You can get the second type by enumerating all types in the assembly.

Note that static binding just works, because in that case the {namespace, name} pair is specified explicitly.

Friday, 25 February 2011 09:09:01 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]
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